2013 Chablis Les Clos (Domaine) William Fevre

Any connoisseur or collector should want a few of the best wines of their type from every vintage to stow in the cellar and this is one such example. This earned a big score from Meadows while also being singled out as perhaps the Chablis of the entire 2013 harvest by Tanzer. Les Clos is typically the most highly sought-after of the Fevre range. From the largest of the grand cru of Chablis, the wines made here from Fevre’s 70-year-old vines are characterised by their deep concentration, firm structure and massive ageing potential. They are spectacularly good and rival many of the very best of the Beaune in quality. Compared to the Beaune however, even the greatest Chablis can be a relative bargain. For this, perhaps the wine of the vintage, to come in at such a low price is remarkable and makes this seriously tempting.
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Average critic rating : 93.75 points



The perfumed and penetrating nose is unusually expressive for a young Les Clos and there is so much iodine, mineral reduction and oyster shell nuances present that this could be from nowhere else but Chablis. The big, powerful and imposingly scaled flavors ooze both dry extract and a pungent minerality yet the balance is perfect on the intensely saline finish that is markedly dry but once again not really austere. This should be terrific though note that patience will be required.



The 2013 Chablis Grand Cru Les Clos has a clean and precise, chalk and white flower-scented bouquet with just a touch of lemon curd behind. The palate is well balanced with good weight in the mouth, just a touch of spice and citrus peel, grilled walnut and smoke surfacing toward the finish that fans out nicely. Excellent. ||No trip to Chablis would be complete without a visit to William Fevre, a producer who combines quantity and quality, in no small part thanks to the talent of head winemaker Didier Séguier. Just like last year we convened in their cellar door adjacent to the Bistro de Grand Cru restaurant. We began by discussing the 2013 vintage that I tasted from vat last year. He told me that in 2013 they began the harvest on September 25 and finished just before the storm on October 3 or 4. As I predicted, these are some of the best 2013s, That picking date was crucial as they avoided the rains that hampered others, especially those with sizable holdings that simply could not expedite the picking for logistical reasons. Their Chablis Bougros Côte Bouguerots 2013 stands as one of the peaks of an admittedly inconsistent vintage, while the Chablis les Clos is not far behind. ||However, the 2014s show more promise than the 2013s. “Flowering was difficult in 2014 because of the warm weather that caused outbreak of coulure, particularly in the earlier [ripening] part of Chablis in the Premier and Grand Cru,” Didier explained. “This reduced the yield by 20% to 30%, but it was not the case for Petit Chablis and Chablis as the flowering tends to be later. That said, the yield was better than 2013, but still less than average. It can be compared to 2012 for us. With regard to the Premier Crus the yield was 25 hectoliters per hectare up to 40 hectoliters per hectare. The summer was not perfect. The weather was a little bit fresh and humid, but at the end of August and September the weather was perfect, the north wind concentrating the fruit. The fruit was perfectly healthy during the harvest with no botrytis. We harvested everything in small baskets and on the sorting table we didn't find anything to take out. We only needed 2 or 3 people manning the table de trie instead of 6 to 8. We started the harvest on September 15 and finished eight days afterwards on September 24. After September 20 there was a stabilization of the sugar accumulation, so there was no need to pick really late apart from some Petit Chablis and Chablis with poor exposure.” In common with many other growers, the 2014s just display more tension, more vigor and for want of a better word, are more “Chablis” than the 2013s. Admittedly, the gap is not as conspicuous here as say at Jean-Marc Brocard, but there is still a tangible difference. I asked Didier himself to summarize the differences between the two vintages.|“I think 2014 is more mineral and fresh, a perfect vintage for purists and Chablis lovers. The 2013s are more approachable with a little less acidity and good richness. The wines are easy to drink and probably with less aging potential compared to 2014." eRobertParker.com.August, 2015


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